Saturday, August 21, 2010

Move Skype History From Windows XP To Windows 7

If you got a new computer like me then you probably want to move your Skype history from your old computer to the new one. In my case I needed to move my Skype history from a Windows XP computer to a Windows 7 computer. This is fairly easy but you want to make sure to do this as quickly as possible so you don’t loose any new conversations on the new computer when you copy the actual data over to the new computer. Follow the directions below and you will have all of your Skype history on the new computer in no time. The below has the same concept on any Operating System but the guidelines are very similar for all Windows computers and Windows Vista has the same path as Windows 7.

Move Skype History From Windows XP To Windows 7:
The easiest way to complete the below direction is by using a thumb drive though you can transfer the data over the network via network shares, using an external hard drive, or any other way you can get the old data onto the new computer. Simply replace USERNAME in the paths below to the user for which Skype is installed.
  • Windows XP Skype History Folder Location:
    C:\Documents and Settings\WINDOWSUSERNAME\Application Data\Skype
  • Windows Vista Skype History Folder Location:
    1C:\Users\WINDOWSUSERNAME\AppData\Roaming\Skype
  • Windows 7 Skype History Folder Location:
    1C:\Users\WINDOWSUSERNAME\AppData\Roaming\Skype
  1. Shutdown Skype On Old PC: Make sure that Skype is turned off on the old computer.
  2. Copy Skype History To USB Drive: Copy the entire Skype directory from above to your USB thumb drive.
  3. Shutdown Skype: Make sure that Skype is turned off on the new computer.
  4. Backup Skype History Locally: On the new computer copy the current Skype folder mentioned in the path listing above based on Windows OS(Operating System) to a place like your Desktop or somewhere else where it will be convenient to access if necessary.
  5. Replace Chatsync Folders: Connect the USB drive to the new computer and navigate to the inside of the Skype folder you copied from the old computer. In the Skype directory you should see sub directories that are named the same as your Skype usernames. Drag the chatsync folder from one of the username folders to the new computer into the username folder on the new computer again using the path references above to locate the Skype history folder. This will overwrite any conversations you have had since installing Skype on the new computer but I imagine your history is more important on the old computer if you have just recently installed Skype. Below are examples of specifically what folder should move from the old computer to the new computer.Move This Skype Chat History Folder From Windows XP:
    1C:\Documents and Settings\WINDOWSUSERNAME\Application Data\Skype\SKYPEUSER\chatsync
    To Overwrite This Skype Chat History Folder On Windows 7:
    1C:\Users\WINDOWSUSERNAME\AppData\Roaming\Skype\SKYPEUSER\chatsync
  6. Start Skype & Log On To Skype: Now launch Skype on the new computer. When launching Skype you may get an error complaining about logon credentials but don’t worry about this right now. If you simply type in your username and password and click login then you should not see the credentials error again. You should now be able to browse your chat history that was stored on the old computer on the new computer.
Repeat step five for any other users you want to copy over the history from another computer to the new computer. Just remember that if you waited to do this for any length of time that next time it would be easier to not have a single conversation before you move over your Skype history.

outlook 2007 backup method

MORE INFORMATION
How to make a backup copy of a .pst fileIf you do not use Outlook with Microsoft...


How to make a backup copy of a .pst file

If you do not use Outlook with Microsoft Exchange Server, Outlook stores all its data in a .pst file. You can use the backup copy to restore your Outlook data if the original .pst file is damaged or lost. This section explains how to create a copy of your whole .pst file, with all the default items in the file.

Follow these steps to back up the whole .pst file:
  1. Close any messaging programs such as Outlook, Microsoft Exchange, or Microsoft Windows Messaging.
  2. Click Start, and then click Run. Copy and paste (or type) the following command in the Open box, and then press ENTER:
    control panel
    Control Panel opens.

    Note If you see the Pick a category screen, click User Accounts, and then go to step 3.
  3. Double-click the Mail icon.
  4. Click Show Profiles.
  5. Click the appropriate profile, and then click Properties.
  6. Click Data Files.
  7. Under Name, click the Personal Folders Service that you want to back up. By default, this service is called Personal Folders. However, it may be named something else.

    Note If you have more than one Personal Folders Service in your profile, you must back up each set of .pst files separately.

    If there are no entries called Personal Folders and you have not yet stored any information such as messages, contacts, or appointments in Outlook, you probably have not yet enabled the Personal Folders Service. Go to the "References" section for information about how to create a .pst file.

    If you have no Personal Folders Services in your profile and you can store information such as messages, contacts, or appointments in Outlook, your information is probably being stored in a mailbox on an Exchange Server. Try using the instructions in the "How to back up .pst file data that is located on a Microsoft Exchange Server" section.
  8. Click Settings, and then note the path and file name that appears.

    Note Because the .pst file contains all data that is stored in the MAPI folders that Outlook uses, the file can be very large. To reduce the size of the .pst file, click Compact Now in the Settings window.
  9. Close all the Properties windows.
  10. Use Windows Explorer or My Computer to copy the file that you noted in step 8. You can copy the file to another location on the hard disk drive or to any kind of removable storage media, such as a floppy disk, a CD-ROM, a portable hard disk drive, a magnetic tape cassette, or any other storage device.

How to back up .pst file data that is located on a Microsoft Exchange Server

To know how to back up your data if you use Outlook with a Microsoft Exchange Server, you have to know where the data is stored. The default delivery and storage location for Outlook data is the Exchange Server mailbox. The Exchange Server administrator usually handles backups of the mailboxes on the server. However, some Exchange Server administrators store Outlook data in a .pst file on your hard disk drive.

Follow these steps to see where Outlook is currently storing your data:

In Outlook 2007:


  1. On the Tools menu, click Options, click the Mail Setup tab, and then click E-mail Accounts.
  2. In the Account Settings window, click the Data Files tab.

    If the Name field contains the word "Mailbox" followed by an e-mail name, Outlook stores data in folders on the Exchange Server. Contact the Exchange Server administrator for more information about how backups are handled.

    If the field contains the words "Personal Folder" or the name of a set of personal folders or .pst files, Outlook stores new messages, contacts, appointments, and other data in a .pst file on your hard disk. To back up the data, go to the "How to make a backup copy of a .pst file" section.

In an earlier version of Outlook:


  1. On the Tools menu, click E-mail Accounts.

    Note This option might be unavailable on some networks. The network administrator might have removed this option to protect the account information. If you do not see the Email Accounts option, contact the network administrator for help.
  2. Click View or Change Existing Email Accounts, and then click Next.
  3. Look at the Deliver new e-mail to the following location option. If the option contains the word "Mailbox" followed by an e-mail name, Outlook stores data in folders on the Exchange Server. Contact the Exchange Server administrator for more information about how backups are handled.

    If the field contains the words "Personal Folder" or the name of a set of personal folders or .pst files, Outlook stores new messages, contacts, appointments, and other data in a .pst file on your hard disk. To back up the data, go to the "How to make a backup copy of a .pst file" section.

How to export .pst file data

If you want to back up only some of your Outlook data, you can create a new backup .pst file of only the data that you want to save. This is also known as exporting .pst file data. For example, you might want to use this section if you have important information in only some folders and you have other, less important items in much larger folders. You can export only the important folders or contacts and omit folders like Sent Mail.

Follow these steps to export a specific folder:
  1. Open Outlook.
  2. On the File menu, click Import And Export. If the menu item is not available, hover your pointer over the chevrons at the bottom of the menu, and then click Import and Export.
  3. Click Export To File, and then click Next.
  4. Click Personal Folder File (.pst) , and then click Next.
  5. Click the folder that you want to export the .pst file to, and then click Next.
  6. Click Browse, and then select the location where you want the new .pst file to be saved.
  7. In the File Name box, , type the name that you want to use for the new .pst file, and then click OK.
  8. Click Finish.
Note Folder design properties include permissions, filters, description, forms, and views. If you export items from one .pst file to another, no folder design properties are maintained.

How to import .pst file data into Outlook

You can use the backup copy of your .pst file to restore your Outlook data if the original .pst file is damaged or lost. Everything that is saved in the .pst file is returned to Outlook.

Follow these steps to restore, or import, your data into Outlook:
  1. If the .pst file that you want to import is stored on a removable device, such as a floppy disk, a portable hard disk drive, a CD-ROM, a magnetic tape cassette, or any other storage medium, insert or connect the storage device, and then copy the .pst file to the hard disk drive of the computer.

    When you copy the .pst file, make sure that the Read-Only attribute is not selected. If this attribute is selected, you might receive the following error message:
    The specified device, file, or path could not be accessed. It may have been deleted, it may be in use, you may be experiencing network problems, or you may not have sufficient permission to access it. Close any application using this file and try again.
    If you receive this error message, clear the Read-Only attribute, and then copy the file again.
  2. Open Outlook.
  3. On the File menu, click Import And Export. If the command is not available, rest the pointer over the chevrons at the bottom of the menu, and then click Import and Export.
  4. Click Import from another program or file, and then click Next.
  5. Click Personal Folder File (.pst), and then click Next.
  6. Type the path and the name of the .pst file that you want to import, and then click Next.
  7. Select the folder that you want to import. To import everything in the .pst file, select the top of the hierarchy.
  8. Click Finish.

How to transfer Outlook data from one computer to another computer

You cannot share or synchronize .pst files between one computer and another computer. However, you can still transfer Outlook data from one computer to another computer.

Use the instructions in the "How to make a backup copy of a .pst file" section to copy the .pst file to a CD or DVD-ROM or other portable media, or copy the file to another computer over a LAN/WAN link.

Note Connecting to .pst files over LAN/WAN links is not supported and problems connecting to .pst files over such links can occur. See the following article for more information:

297019  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/297019/EN-US/ ) Personal folder files are unsupported over a LAN or over a WAN link

You might also want to create a new, secondary .pst file that is intended for transferring data only. Save the data that you want to transfer in this new .pst file and omit any data that you do not want to transfer. If you need to make a secondary .pst file to store data for transfer between two different computers, or for backup purposes, use the following steps:
  1. On the File menu, point to New, and then click Outlook Data File.
  2. Type a unique name for the new .pst file, for example, type Transfer.pst, and then click OK.
  3. Type a display name for the Personal Folders file, and then click OK.
  4. Close Outlook.
Follow these steps to copy an existing .pst file:
  1. Use the instructions in the "How to make a backup copy of a .pst file" section to make a backup copy of the .pst file that you want to transfer. Make sure that you copy the backup .pst file to a CD-ROM or other kind of removable media.
  2. Copy the backup .pst file from the removable media to the second computer.
  3. Follow the steps in the "How to import .pst file data into Outlook" section to import the .pst file data into Outlook on the second computer.

How to back up Personal Address Books

Your Personal Address Book might contain e-mail addresses and contact information that is not included in an Outlook Address Book or contact list. The Outlook Address Book can be kept either in an Exchange Server mailbox or in a .pst file. However, the Personal Address Book creates a separate file that is stored on your hard disk drive. To make sure that this address book is backed up, you must include any files that have the .pab extension in your backup process.

Follow these steps to locate your Personal Address Book file:
  1. If you are running Windows Vista: Click Start.

    If you are running Windows XP: Click Start, and then click Search.

    If you are running Microsoft Windows 95 or Microsoft Windows 98: Click Start, point to Find, and then click Files or Folders.

    If you are running Microsoft Windows 2000 or Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me): Click Start, point to Search, and then click For Files or Folders.
  2. Type *.pab, and then press ENTER or click Find Now.

    Note the location of the .pab file. Use My Computer or Windows Explorer to copy the .pab file to the same folder or storage medium that contains the backup of the .pst file.
You can use this backup to restore your Personal Address Book to your computer or transfer it to another computer. Follow these steps to restore the Personal Address Book:
  1. Close any messaging programs such as Outlook, Microsoft Exchange, or Windows Messaging.
  2. Click Start, and then click Run. Copy and paste (or type) the following command in the Open box, and then press ENTER:
    control panel
    Control Panel opens.

    Note If you see the Pick a category screen, click User Accounts.
  3. Double-click the Mail icon.
  4. Click Show Profiles.
  5. Click the appropriate profile, and then click Properties.
  6. Click Email Accounts.
  7. Click Add a New Directory or Address Book, and then click Next
  8. Click Additional Address Books, and then click Next.
  9. Click Personal Address Book, and then click Next.
  10. Type the path and the name of the Personal Address Book file that you want to restore, click Apply, and then click OK.
  11. Click Close, and click then OK.
Note The Outlook Address Book is a service that the profile uses to make it easier to use a Contacts folder in a Mailbox, Personal Folder File, or Public Folder as an e-mail address book. The Outlook Address Book itself contains no data that has to be saved.

Saturday, March 6, 2010

India Where r thou?

India also faces problems associated with accommodating religion and diversity within a large federal republic, making their experience important for Americans concerned with these issues. India faces growing action of governing which invites the use of violence to achieve political objectives. In spite of India's size and importance, it is hard for an American to gain an understanding of the issues and conflicts which have set the stage for the most recent revival of Hindu nationalism. The central feature of this new reform in Indian federal politics is the clash between Hindu and secular nationalists.

The overview of this situation comes from the perspective of an American born Indian student interested in Indian history and federal systems, so the observations are intended as suggestions designed to encourage more progressive work both in India and the United States. While the prominence of Hindu themes affects many levels of Indian government, this paper will focus only on India's central government on Hindu Nationalism. This conflict is crucial to understanding the current situation in India.

Indian democracy and secularism face a menace from the forces of militant Hinduism which hope to turn India into a Hindu state. What is the nature of the present challenge to secularism in India? What do Hindu nationalists hope to achieve by making their government more assertively Hindu? One can begin to answer these questions by examining the large body of writing on secularism recently produced by Indians. Academics, lawyers, journalists, and political citizens have explored the many facets of Indian secularism. These works provide clues to the nature of Hindu nationalism's appeal in contemporary Indian politics.

Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Roleplaying Styles in RPG

A role-playing game (RPG) is a broad family of games in which players assume the roles of characters, or take control of one or more avatars, in a fictional setting. Actions taken within the game succeed or fail according to a formal system of rules and guidelines.



The original form, sometimes called the pen-and-paper RPG, is conducted through speech. In live action role-playing games (LARP), players perform their characters' physical actions.In both of these forms, an arranger called a game master (GM) usually decides on the rules and setting to be used and acts as referee, while each other player plays the role of a single character.At the heart of these formats is in-character participation in a collaborative narrative. Several varieties of RPG exist in electronic media, including text-based MUDs and their graphics-based successors, massively multiplayer online role-playing games.

Role-playing games also include offline role-playing video games in which players control a character or party of characters who undertake quests, and whose capabilities advance using statistical mechanics. These games often share settings and rules with pen-and-paper RPGs, but do not enable the same collaborative storytelling.

The act of roleplaying is a communal creative process, which turns social interactions into the basis for a fictional story. Each person assumes the role of a character in that story, and the plot develops based on the nature of the interactions between the various people involved. It is a living process which can change at the drop of a hat, and so the style of the people involved can be very important to the outcome of the story told.

Some people prefer a loose and laid back style of storytelling. This method allows jokes to be told, and out of character comments to be made at appropriate times. It is an easy, comfortable experience. The positive benefit is that everyone can feel free to be as creative as they want. The drawback is that the story can often be derailed by silliness, or inconsequential matters.

A stricter, more rigid style will often have characters following what is almost a script. While nobody will actually feed lines to the players, the situation will be strictly structured, so that certain outcomes are almost a certainty. In these cases the authority, whoever that may be, is usually given a large amount of power to regulate the entire process. The draw is that you always get a quality story that makes logical sense. The problem is, it can restrict the creativity of those involved, robbing you of a truly magical experience.

In most cases, the best way to handle a roleplaying session is with a certain amount of balance. You want to understand things from both perspectives. In some cases it's a good idea to be silly. In others it's important to maintain a serious atmosphere, in order to support the illusion of the game.

The idea is to create the most enjoyable experience for the players, and as such you should strive to make sure that everyone is comfortable and feels engaged. This can best be done by maintaining both a healthy dose of rigidity, and a subtle hint of humor and flexibility.

Monday, January 18, 2010

Video Games, and Their Impact on Us

Video games has been around us for many years now. Over the course of those years, the gaming industry has changed drastically. Even now it's still continuing to change, advancing further, and further. It has really became a big impact on our lives. Because of these games, many new trends has develop. Conventions involving video games for an example has became quite popular. People from all around come to these conventions to express their love, and inspirations as players. Video game contests has even became popular, where players test their advanced skills, and strategies against other players alike. These are just two of many trends that were created due to games.

Even though playing games are often used for leisure time, they can also be used to benefit, our health in a positive way. Certain games such as puzzles, trivial, and strategies, can stimulate our brains, in which sharpens our thinking skills. With this, they could increase our mathematics skills, reading skills, and vocabulary. Playing games can also satisfy our emotional needs. When we complete a board, or a stage, and the plot of the game becomes more interesting, we become invigorated, and we become motivated

Recently new games has been made to benefit our physical health namely weight loss. Games like the Wii-Fit has not only helped the physical health of the younger generation, but the older generation as well. These games help people become more aware of their own physical health, while having fun in doing so!

All this, and more goes to show that video games has an important role in our everyday lives. Isn't it amazing how video games are not just for fun, but also can be solutions to many of our health problems.

Tuesday, January 5, 2010

How to Add Google Analytics to Your Blogger Blog

Grab Your Google Analytics Code Block
Login to Google Analytics at http://google.com/analytics/. The main Settings page loads.
Click on Add Website Profile. A form displays.
Select Add a Profile for a New Domain.
Enter the URL of your site or blog.
Select your country and time zone. Click Finish.
Analytics provides you with a code block - a swatch of HTML - to add to your site's pages.
Highlight the code block and then copy it by selecting Edit > Copy or Ctrl-C or Command-C.
Add the Google Analytics Code Block to Your Blogger Blog
Login to http://www.blogger.com/. The Dashboard loads.
Under the blog you want to add Analytics tracking to, click on Layout or Template.
Click on Edit HTML. An editing screen for your blog template's HTML displays. Don't freak out. Just scroll to the bottom.
Look for the end of the template. just before the body tag
(Google Analytics Code Block is going to go here!!!)


Put your cursor right before that body tag.
Paste the Google Analytics Code Block by selecting Edit > Paste, Ctrl -V or Command-V.
Click Save Changes.
You have now added the Google Analytics Code Block to Your Blogger Blog.

Check Your Work
To ensure that you have successfully added the Google Analytics Code Block to your Blogger blog, go back to http://google.com/analytics/.
Next to your blog's URL it will say either Receiving Data (you were successful) or Tracking Not Installed (something is amiss).
If it said Tracking Not Installed, click on Check Status. Google then checks your blog for the Analytics Code Block and reports back if it find it or not.
If not, try re-pasting the Code Block in.

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